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Mainstreet of kiev  early 1960

Mainstreet of kiev  early 1960

1997 kiev-city 

1997 kiev-city 

ZAZ 968a 

ZAZ 968a 

Pripyat-city before disaster.

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title on billboard “The name and ideas of Lenin will be live forever!”

Pripyat was founded in 1970 to house workers for the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. It was officially proclaimed a city in 1979 but was abandoned in 1986 following the Chernobyl disaster. It was the ninth nuclear city (“атомоград” (atomograd) in Russian, literally “atom city”) in the Soviet Union at the time and its population was around 50,000 before the accident. The annual rate of natural increase for the city’s population was estimated at around 800 persons, plus over 500 newcomers from all corners of the Soviet Union each year.[citation needed], and Pripyat’s population had been expected to rise to 78,000. The Yanov railroad station (part of Chernigov-Ovruch railroad link) was less than 1 km away from the city, and the navigable Pripyat River flows nearby. 

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Population: 49,400 before the disaster. The average age was about 26 years old. Total living space was 658,700 m2: 13,414 apartments in 160 apartment blocks, 18 halls of residence accommodating up to 7,621 single males or females, and 8 halls of residence for married or defacto couples.

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Education: 15 primary schools for about 5,000 children, 5 secondary schools, 1 professional school.

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Healthcare: 1 hospital that could accommodate up to 410 patients, and 3 clinics.

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Trade: 25 stores and malls; 27 cafes, cafeterias and restaurants could serve up to 5,535 customers simultaneously. 10 warehouses could hold 4,430 tons of goods. 

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Book shop

Culture: 3 facilities: a culture palace, a cinema and a school of arts, with 8 different societies. 

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Post office

Sports: 10 gyms, 3 indoor swimming-pools, 10 shooting galleries, 2 stadiums. 

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Recreation: 1 park, 35 playgrounds, 18,136 trees, 249,247 shrubs, 33,000 rose plants.

Industry: 4 factories with total annual turnover of 477,000,000 rubles. 1 nuclear power plant.

Transportation: Yanov railway station, 167 urban buses, plus the nuclear power plant car park of about 400 units.

Telecommunication: 2,926 local phones managed by the Pripyat Phone Company, plus 1,950 phones owned by Chernobyl power station’s administration, Jupiter plant and Department of Architecture and Urban Development.

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by Dmitriy Savin

by Dmitriy Savin

the central place of “Borshchagovka”, mid 70s, Kiev

Borshchahívka (Ukrainian: Борщагі́вка, Russian: Борщаго́вка) is a neighbourhood located to the west and south-west of Kiev, Ukraine. It is part of the Svyatoshyn district of Kiev.The neighbourhood is named after a large village that was founded at the site. The contemporary urban look comes from the 1960s and 1970s. The neighbourhood is divided into two sections: Mykilska and Pivdenna (South) Borshchahivka. A village named Petropavlivska Borshchahivka also exists nearby, but it does not belong to Kiev.A fast tram line connects Borshchahivka with Kiev’s central railway station. 

the central place of “Borshchagovka”, mid 70s, Kiev

Borshchahívka (Ukrainian: Борщагі́вка, Russian: Борщаго́вка) is a neighbourhood located to the west and south-west of Kiev, Ukraine. It is part of the Svyatoshyn district of Kiev.

The neighbourhood is named after a large village that was founded at the site. The contemporary urban look comes from the 1960s and 1970s. The neighbourhood is divided into two sections: Mykilska and Pivdenna (South) Borshchahivka. A village named Petropavlivska Borshchahivka also exists nearby, but it does not belong to Kiev.

A fast tram line connects Borshchahivka with Kiev’s central railway station.
 

Moscow bridge and Obolon at background , Kiev

Moscow bridge and Obolon at background , Kiev

The central square of Kiev 1987

The central square of Kiev 1987